Ossus Library Index Fantasy Movie Index

SNOW WHITE AND THE SEVEN DWARFS

Directed by Ken Anderson et al. (1937, Walt Disney Pictures)
Featuring voices by Adriana Caselotti, Roy Atwell, and Pinto Colvig

After running from her evil and vain stepmother, a young woman befriends a group of unique men in the forest.

 

 

5 stars

March 6th, 2011 on DVD for the 5th time

 
    It seems that every time I watch this movie, I'm completely blown away. The character work and especially the animation are superb. This movie stands up on its own even today, which continues to amaze me. The dwarfs were individually realized, but of course Dopey was the most active and adorable. The animals were characters in their own right, and the witch deals her own demise, which is of course typical in a story of this sort. Only Snow White's voice annoyed me a little- but just a little. Showing this to my son and watching him be amazed was amazing for me, too. His favorite part was the washing of Grumpy, which of course is very funny in itself.  

 

5 stars

January 22nd, 2003 on DVD for the 4th time

 
    In a word, outstanding. The only thing that is really missing in this story is some semblance of a real plot. The plot is enough, however, to hold the movie, as the characters, music, songs, comedy and animation carry it completely.

The most outstanding thing about this movie is the animation. I can't praise it highly enough. True, there are some scenes that look a little washed out, and don't seem to fit in with the rest of the movie -several scenes at the very beginning come to mind. However, there are scenes like Snow White's reflection in the mirror, the incredible blurs that appear, from the Queen's transformation, to the amazing fog that she paddles through on the river, and more, that feel like they haven't been surpassed even today! These days, animators need computers to get effects like that -which shows how amazing the animation on this film was.

The colors are also used to accent the story, and used extremely well. I can't even imagine how an audience in 1937 would have felt seeing this color film for the first time.

What really holds the movie together are the characters. Snow White is actually less of a character, and more like a stimulus. She barely has a personality, being naive and so innocent. The dwarfs (dwarves?), however, are complete characters. They also provide the best comic relief. We immediately fell in love with Dopey, who also seems to be the smartest of the dwarfs. He fawns over Snow White, but is the first to realize that there is only one pillow. He figures out how to be taller to dance with her, and knows how to play the drums. I absolutely loved the way he tried to hunt and pounce on the soap when they were washing Grumpy!

Incidental characters, but no less important to the story, were the animals. From the adorable rabbits to the blushing birds, and finally the incredible turtle, the poor thing took forever to get up the stairs (or anywhere), and was still happy about it! So cute!

Being a mono soundtrack (and not having Dolby Digital surround system at home), the movie was at times difficult to hear, as voices became overwhelmed by the background music or sound effects. Snow White was especially difficult, because of the high pitch of her voice. A case in point is her first song, which comes off much better among the dwarfs than in the forest. I spend the next several days after seeing this movie singing "Heigh Ho!", however!

It was nearly ten years since I last saw Snow White, and I remember being blown away by it then, too. Surprisingly, I had forgotten so much of it, especially the beginning.

At first I was disappointed that the movie was shown in full-frame, but then recalled (and subsequently verified) that back in 1937, movies were always in what we now call full-frame. They only changed when TV came along, for fear of the competition. The DVD menus are neat, though they got annoying the more days we watched the movie -taking way too long to get anywhere. Still, similar to Beauty and the Beast and Monsters, Inc., if you wait too long, the Magic Mirror starts making funny comments.

At this time, I've only watched the special features on Disc 1, the most impressive of which is the very interesting documentary on the making of Snow White. I also thought the game was a lot of fun, something I haven't enjoyed on other DVDs. The Guided Tours are a neat idea, but don't watch them the same night as watching the special features, as they actually show us parts of those features. Disc 2 will have to wait a while, for it looks like there are many nights of viewing there, with all sorts of other interesting stuff. I can't wait.

The movie, which is the main interest of the DVD, is simply amazing. When compared with some of the footage (not remastered) shown in the documentary features, the actual movie looks astounding. The color is beautiful and the lines are sharp. Truly amazing.

 
   

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